Dawn & I @ George Paton Gallery

GPG-DAWNandI-invite

Link: http://umsu.unimelb.edu.au/what-is-on/gallery/upcoming-exhibitions/

Advertisements

Girls just want to have FUNdamental human rights!

This is just a bit of an update about what I’ve been up to lately and what projects are coming up just over the horizon… in no particular order. 

Firstly, I was extremely honoured to have recently visited “Knit Your Revolt” superstar Shannon Morton in Brisbane to talk all things Craftivism. She said that my figurative quilting has inspiered her to create a story quilt about the “Knit Your Revolt” gang. So we met up so I could show her some techniques and talk more broadly about the power of craftivism. We made this little prototype portrait of one of the gang members: 
 
After which Shannon made gave me a “Knit Your Revolt Tricycle Gang” patch and made me a member of the gang (even though I can’t knit!). I’m so stoked about it – watch this space for future Craftivism actions taken as part of this inspiring group of dissenters.     

After this exciting trip to sunny Queensland it was time to head back to Melbourne and get started on the next two projects:  

The ‘Great Stash Swap’ and ‘fGeneration: Feminism, Art, Progression’ 

I was very excited to be invited to take part in these two totally separate really awesome projects. The Great Statsh Swap was a week long event organised by fellow Craftivist and Crafiti artist Sayraphim Lothian. The project involved getting a bunch of crafty people to get there fabric stacks together at Gallery 314 in Richmond, Melbourne and then to basically swap it for other people’s stash. Over the week this was happening Sayraphim held a sort of pop-up artist in residence, where she invited one artist/crafter to sit and make in the space with her every day. I was one of those lucky artists invited to raid the loot and make something out of it. This was super timely because I had just been invited by artist and curator Caroline Phillips to contribute to an upcoming exhibition at the George Paton Gallery, Melbourne titled: fGeneration: feminism, art, progression. So I ended up making a mini-appliqué quilted hanging titled “Girls just want to have FUNdamental human rights” as my contribution to the exhibition while at The Great Stash Swap. 

This is me making at The Great Stash Swap…    

I’m also going to show another little mini-embroided quilted hanging at fGeneration, this one is titled “Feminist KillJoy”. I made just for fun not long ago and luckily for me it fits right in with the exhibition theme!

 

Venus Court

Another really exciting art-making project which I’m happy to finally be able to share is my first ever commission. Venus Court is a Melbourne based band made up of two talented brothers Jake and Sam O’Brien, I’ve known them forever and my partner George Carpenter produced their upcoming EP at his Gold Coast studio ‘Little Pink’. They have both been big supporters of my work and at the start of the year they asked me to make them a quilted banner for their band that they can use on stage. I made them this hanging below (2m x2m)  and they were so stoked with it that they’ve decided to use it as the cover of their upcoming EP! 

  

This is them standing in front of the hanging during the photo shoot for the cover – as you can see it’s a portrait of them.  
 

Below is a super close up to give you a sense of what the work looks like up close and in 3D.

  

In between these bigger projects I’ve been playing around with some smaller crafty ideas. I’ve started hand making patches using felt and embroidery and I’ve also started a very ambitious cross-stitching piece as my response/contribution to Peter Drew’s “Real Australian’s Say Welcome” campaign. 

   
  
As you can see this cross stitch is nowhere near finished – I can’t believe how long it takes! Luckily I was in bed for three weeks with pneumonia recently otherwise I would never of got as much as I have done. I guess its going to be one of those ongoing labour of love type pieces.

Upcoming Projects:  

Finally, I have three really exciting projects coming up in the next 6 months that will make up the primary case-studies for my practice-led PhD research. They are all socially engaged craftivism projects that involve a partnership with different non-profit organisations. 

The first is a non-traditional residency with Igniting Change, a charity that works to support some really outstanding organisations including the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre. I will be spending about 4 weeks over Oct/Nov this year in their office space making a story-quilt that celebrates the values of the organisation and shares some of the impacts they’ve had. I’ll be donating this work to Igniting Change so they can use it as a story telling device to help with communicating their complex work going forward. 

The second will be a project delivered when I’m a guest-in-residence at the Billilla Historic Mansion in Brighton thanks to artist and craftivist Kate Just who has kindly given me her studio there while she is overseas. The project will involve raising funds and awareness for the International Woman’s Development Agency through me making and giving away a appliqué quilted portrait of the first 50 people who donate $50 to the organisation as part of this campaign. I’ll be launching this project in December so keep an eye out for that. 

The final project is a series of Crafternoons which I will facilitate at the Museum of Australian Democracy at Eureka in Ballarat. These workshops will hapen around March 2016 and focus around the issue of getting young people engaged and excited about voting. Again I’ll have more information to share about this project later in the year.   

  
Oh yeah, and I nearly forgot – I am also going to be contributing a quilted/appliqué hanging to an exhibition that the Ballarat Quilters Association is holding at the Museum of Australian Democracy at Eureka in Ballarat. Contributors to this exhibition were asked to create works in response to the lyrics from a selection of songs about freedom and democracy. My contribution will be called “this old freedom train is such a long time in a comin'” and above is a work-in-progress shot of the piece.  

That’s all for now, thanks for stopping by and keep an eye out for more updates in the coming weeks. 

x  

Artspiration

This is a post about two contemporary artists that I am currently totally loosing my shit over:

Peru born artist Ana Teresa Barboza and,  Melbourne based artist Lucas Grogan.

What I love about textile art is its ability to stop us in our tracks and look again at a work, considering not just the image but the materials, its construction, the labour involved, the way the work triggers associations in our minds. In my opinion, both Ana and Lucas incorporate textile and needlework into their practice in such a way that for me truly highlights the tantalising and sensual potential of textile art.

Ana Teresa Barboza

anateresabarboza2

Ana Teresa Barboza, who studies to be a painter, uses needle and thread as an invitation for audiences to engage with her works not just visually but using touch and memory and their imagination. Many of her works explore the body, femininity and domesticity as well as our relations with one another and with a fantastical imagining of the animal realm. I’m really inspired by the way she incorporates figures into her works alongside flora, fauna and patterns of colour and texture.

anateresabarboza3anateresabarboza4anateresabarboza7

Her bold use of colours, pattern and texture and the way she contrasts these against one another is so satisfying. Plus I love the playful way Ana incorporates her painting practice with her needlework in several of her body’s of work, such as these:

anateresabarboza6

anateresabarboza8

Sophie in her Blog Le Fil Conducteur has written a great post including an interview with Ana in which she talks about how needlework is something she learned from her grandmother, you can check it out at: https://lefilconducteurinenglish.wordpress.com/2013/07/21/ana-teresa-barboza-gubo/ 

Some of Ana’s more recent work has involved taking inspiration from natural landscapes, plants and she has started to stitch onto photographs as well as canvas. You can take a look at some of this work on Sam’s post on the Textile Artist blog: http://www.textileartist.org/ana-teresa-barboza-handcraft-nature/ 

anateresabarboza5

Ana has got me very inspired to continue developing my own embroidery skills.

Lucas Grogan

Lucas lives and works in Melbourne and really likes the colour blue. Like a lot!
He works across a whole raft of mediums including quilting, embroidery and cross stitch and I just adore everything he does. His body of work is so vast that it is pretty overwhelming, but here is a bunch of his textile work for you to drool over…

lucasgrogan-wedding quiltlucasgrogan-wedding quilt2 LUCAS-GROGAN-THE-PERFECT-ALIGNMENT-2013-GLUCAS-GROGAN-BE-EXTREMELY-CAREFUL-webLUCAS-GROGAN-THE-UNIVERSE-QUILT-2013-G

LUCAS-GROGAN-THE-FUCKING-MINEFIELD-webLUCAS-GROGAN-SOMETHINGS-GONE-SERIOUSLY-AMISS-2013-G

As you can see the way he incorporates text is really interesting and really compelling, for me they are little micro narratives, snippets into contemporary life, the thoughts that flash across our minds and then are gone – captured and memorialised in the use of this time consuming and thoughtful textile practice.

LUCAS-GROGAN-THE-BOMB-2013-G

So yea, inspired!

Image credits: Unless stated otherwise all images are from Ana’s Blog: http://anateresabarboza.blogspot.ch/ and from Lucas Grogan’s website: http://www.lucasgrogan.com/ – please go check out their sites and acknowledge them if you share these images ❤

My full PhD Confirmation Report

As promised here is my full PhD Confirmation Report, submitted in April 2015
as a PDF document:
Confirmation-Report-Tal-Fitzpatrick-2015

Alternatively, below is the Title/Research Question/Abstract for all those of you who “aint got time fo’dat!”

Research Title:                 Craftivism and the Political Moment

Research Question:         Can craftivism create Political Moments?

Sub Questions:

  • How is craftivism different from other forms of activism?
  • Can a material, craft based practice such as craftivism be understood as a socially engaged art?
  • In light of a post-political critique of participation is it possible to initiate political moments through socially engaged artistic practices?
  • How do feminist new materialist and post-humanist conceptions of agency and matter reshape our understanding of power and the potential of art to enact social change?

Abstract:

This practice-led research project is shaped by an artistic practice that plays in the spaces between craft, socially engaged art, activism, community development and autoethnography. It looks to explore how a particular style of figurative appliqué quilting might be used to initiate what philosopher Jacques Rancière describes as ‘political moments’ in a post-political environment. Through a series of creative case studies delivered in and with different community groups and organisations, this project will test the material-discursive potential of appliqué quilting to act as a socially engaged strategy for activism.

Importantly, this project doesn’t aim to develop a set of tools for leading revolutions or even to create a methodology where outcomes can be reliably repeated. Instead it looks to develop a practice based methodology for becoming more mindful of the patterns of consequential differences and of the overlapping ideas between: art, craft, activism, socially engaged practice, feminist new materialisms, post-political critique, post-humanism and community development theory.

However, if anyone actually does read my full report – I would love to hear your thoughts, feedback, reading suggestions, artists I should know about and constructive criticism. As always you can get in touch with me via email: tal.fitzpatrick@gmail.com

Finally – just for fun, below are some of my powerpoint slides from my PhD Confirmation presentation.

Cheers

Tal

Slide03Slide08

Slide06

Slide09Slide10

Slide11

ECH Stories of Resilience Cloth Art project – part 2

Following on from my residency at Emerald Community House (ECH) and in the lead up to this years annual PAVE festival I have begun stage two of the ‘Stories of Resilience in Cloth Art’ project – a workshop series where I invite locals to make their own cloth-artwork that tells a story about resilience and what it means to them.  

As I’ve mentioned previously ECH is an innovative neighbourhood centre that is highly conscious of the fact that they are in a disaster-at-risk area of the Victorian Dandenong ranges. ECH  takes proactive action through their programming to build local community resilience, for example: they run an award winning program that entails making attending a bushfire safety training workshop mandatory for all parents who place their children with the ECH childcare servie. When I first met with Mary and Non (ECH coordinators) they identified that there is a gap in the programing which they wanted to address. They wanted to develop a creative program that targeted  younger women who are new to the area and women who don’t have children (and therefore are not involved with ECH through its childcare services) and engaged them around the subject of resilience and disaster preparedness. So, it was around this mandate that I designed my ECH residency and workshop project which I am also using as a case study for my PhD research into how art cloth-art and the strategies of craftivism can enact agency.  

The idea is that each of us will create our own cloth wall hanging to be exhibited during the PAVE festival in the Emerald Community Hall which we are working out of, which everyone will then take home and keep at the end of the exhibition. Bruce Esplin, former Emergency Services Commissioner of Victoria and a friend and mentor of mine has kindly agreed to be at the opening of the exhibition and to say a few words about art and resilience based on his own experience as a photographer and a sculpture. Three local ladies (and one of their dogs, below) have signed on to be part of the project, and over the past couple of weeks we have been meeting on Thursdays to talk about ideas and start sewing.  Already I have had a really interesting conversations and positive responses from this engagement. 

When I asked the ladies (who I won’t identify by name) what resilience means to them and why they chose to live in Emerald as both were relatively new to the area (by rural standards at least – where you have to be second generation to consider yourself a ‘true local’) they all responded with comments about the importance of the landscape and the natural environment. This led to a conversation about the risks posed by the natural environment in their area and we spoke about those and what experiences each lady had with disasters and what plans they had in place in preparation for potential future disasters. Each women will be working to depicting images of the natural environment into their cloth hangings and in her own way working to symbolise in cloth her relationship to the local community. 



Alongside the importance of the natural world the women identified that their personal relationships and history are another critical factor for thier own resilience and well-being. Each woman will be in her own way incorporating figures into the landscapes of their hangings. Using old clothes and fabric given to them from their loved ones the women have started to constuct a picture of how they will represent their stories. We talked about how it is possible in this medium of cloth to tell a very personal story in a way that they feel safe having on public display because it is possible to tell it in such a subtle way, using signs that fully reveal their secrets only to the artist. For example, the artist might incorporate a piece of cloth that was once a dress that belonged to their grandmother and which they associate with a particular time, place and memory. In this way the artist will be able to read the work in a way that tells a very different story to what others might see. The hangings will therefore tell many stories – as each person who views them interprets them and projects their own thoughts, experiences and emotions onto the work.     



The conversation then  shifted to a focus on art making and craft practices. In our conversations we identified that having the time to make art is a luxury that many can not afford, and that many more do not allow themselves. The women identified a sense that this is somehow because taking the time to do something fun and creative feels selfish. This feeling of guilt for taking the time to do something for themselves is a feeling I’m sure many women experience – as women we are still expected by society and in turn we expect ourselves to focus on others, to be caretakers to be busy and selfless. Furthermore, the creative work women do is continues to be undervalued – seen as craft not art. Particularly when it comes to working in textiles. This is something that came up during my residency and during these workshops, it is something they I will continue to ponder and to research. Finally, we spoke about how the project had opened up time for them to reflect, think and make plans for the future and how valuable this is to them. This too is something I want to understand more clearly. I’ve asked everyone to keep a note of how they experience this project as it unfolds and to write a bit of a reflection about the journey at the end of the project – I’m looking forward to reading them. 

In closing, I feel that the fact that the three participants fit exactly into the target audience ECH identified is a testimony to the fact the project was designed and marketed successfully. However, In saying that it would have been nice to have more people involved and the fact the workshops are being held during the day on a Thursday has been indentified as a barrier to some who would have otherwise liked to participate. I’m considering delivering a one day master-class in order to engage more women in these conversations and hopefully get a few more involved in the making of cloth hangings for the PAVE festival. 

Oh p.s. there was a little story about the project in the local newspaper: 

Cheers 

Tal 



ECH Residency day 7&8

Thursday and Friday were my last two days at Emerald Community House for the residency component of this project. They were quiet, sunny and warm and I was able to finish the quilt-top with time to spare. This is it:

2015/01/img_2644.jpg I worked in the Emerald Star Bush, the Helmeted honey eater, the orange bellied parrot and some bees into the borders of the hanging (the possum didn’t make it unfortunately – I tried a few different ways of doing him but he just looked like a giant mouse). Here are some close-up shots:
2015/01/img_2648.jpg
2015/01/img_2656.jpg
2015/01/img_2654.jpg
The next step is to do the actual quilting bit, where you sandwich the quilt top and the backing with batting in the middle and sew it all together. I have finished off a quilt this size on my machine before, but I decided to pay someone with a ‘long-arm’ sewing machine to do it this time. I’m not sure if I’m going to like the results aesthetically as Kelly (the lady with the long-arm) is going to do a one colour thread ‘meandering’ pattern over the entire hanging… but its worth trying at least once and its saving me about three days of sewing at a time when I really need to focus on my upcoming confirmation. Hopefully it goes okay.

The second part of this project will begin in the first week of February when I start running an 8 week workshop series at Emerald Community House project. Hopefully around 5 people will sign up to participate, registrations are only opening now. The workshops are less me teaching how to make stuff (as I’m just learning) and more an opportunity/reason to get together and be crafty around a subject with an exhibition outcome. We will be working on individual, smaller sized wall hangings that will be exhibited as part of this year’s PAVE festival – a local art festival held in Emerald. The theme for this work will once again be resilience as that is the issue that Emerald Community House has identified as being of particular importance and it is also an area that I have some experitice in which is part of the reason I’m there in the first place.

These two different approaches (residency v. workshops) to working with a community around a specific theme are the beginnings of my practical/practice led PhD research. Essentially I am experimenting with different ways of engaging and interacting with community in order to explore what the practice of cloth-art can reveal about a specific site. What does the unique logic of this practice reveal about a community? what can be learned through this type of engagement? What is generated as a result of these experiences? How does engaging with community impact my practice? These are just some of the questions I am interested in unpacking as I go forward and do this type of work in different communities and contexts.

Thats all for now, I’ll put up a photo of the finished ECH wall hanging as soon as possible. I think I’m going to call it “Resilience, Resistance and Responsibility”…

ECH Residency – Day 4

Today is Friday and I am not going up to Emerald. I needed to go buy a whole bunch more fabric and get a few things organised befor the weekend. Saturday and Sunday are both going to be super busy! On Saturday the community is taking over the airwaves in a localised pirate radio protest to keep the old local radio station in community hands, everyone is dressing as pirates! Plus, I’m going to be interviewed on the airwaves about this project. Sunday is the day of the monthly local markets which are held at the hall where I have been working. I am going to have a little stall and do some ‘performance sewing’ and continue my conversations with locals about what being resilient means to them.
Awesome
^_^

Yesterday, which was day 4 of the residency was a busy day. I had lots of people come in and have a yarn with me.
It started with a visit from Graeme, who is on the Cockatoo Neighbourhood Centre committee and a long-time local to the region. Mary and Non joined us and the four of us had an hour long conversation about a wide range of issues affecting them on a local, state, national and global level. Graeme is the full time carer of his adult son who lives with a disability and needs constant care. I identified strongly with the challenges that Graeme faces as a sole carer as my older brother also lives with a disability and requires full time care. Currently my brother Guy lives with my parents, our long term plan as a family is that I will take over as his carer when my parent can no longer manage. Luckily for us we don’t live in a high-fire danger area and do not have to worry too much about what we would need to do if we had to evacuate the house on a high-risk day. Graeme does, and he told us that there is nowhere he and his son can really that he can go on a high-risk day; Frustratingly for him the nearby respite centres all close on high-risk days… So he got a car that they can sleep in.

2015/01/img_2570.jpg
It’s stories like Graeme’s, or like the story Non shared about another young (25year old) local man who has taken on a carer role for his brother after he was in a serious accident, that really strike home how important it is for us to operate as communities that look after one-another. That is the kind of society that I want to live in at least – one where we can rely on each other for help. They also reminded us that it is not only women taking on carer roles and that men also struggle with the same challenges of isolation, inability to get work that allows them the flexibility they meet to meet their responsibilities and the worry of what will happen to their loved ones when they are no longer able to care for them.

Later in the afternoon Suzanne, the ECH cleaner came over to have a yarn. We talked about some craft projects she has done in the past and then Suzanne shared a deeply personal story about what resilience means to her and what has helped her to overcome the challenges she has faced in life. She told me that what has helped her to live with the effects of trauma was learning how to get a critical distance from what happened. Adding that ‘fear might be all you get – we have to learn to listen to our intuition more’. Whether its on a high-risk day when you have to decide whether to leave, or whether you are feeling uneasy about being alone in a dark ally or in a domestic situation, sometimes fear is a red flag that we must listen to in order to save ourselves.

While Suzanne and I were talking another lady came in, she is a local artist that works in leadlight and glass. She wanted to know a bit about my practice and my process, and whether I was getting paid and fining a way to make a living off my practice. She said that despite the fact she has been living off her own practice for over 30 years people (mostly men apparently) still treat her like she is a hobbyist – not a real artist. we talked about the unfortunate statistics around how much less women are represented by professional galleries, exhibited in solo shows and how much less money they get for their art. She told me not to listen to people’s bullshit and to keep going with my art – generous advice. She also talked about how much Emerald has changed since she when she was a child growing up here; about how lots of building that should have been heritage listed have disappeared and how the culture of the area has changed. She’s going to be there on Sunday for the markets and I look forward to talking some more and having a look at her work. Finally another lady who makes bags to sell at the markets walked through and had a quick chat – we mostly talked sewing techniques, I’ll see her again on Sunday too.

Meanwhile Lee, who visited me on Tuesday and whom I wrote about in my previous post shared this on her FB page which was nice of her.

2015/01/img_2577.png I am definitely going to make sure the possum ends up on the finished work – the leadbeater’s possum is the cutest!!

2015/01/img_2418.jpg

From all the conversations I had today the two main points that stuck with are issues that I’ve been exploring in my work in community/ non-profit sector for several years:
1) How can we address the crucial difference between equal opportunity and equal outcomes – so that everyone in society, even if the are somewhat disadvantaged/margionalised (whether that is because of class, race, gender, beliefs or ability) are able to achieve the same outcomes as everyone else?
2) How do we move from the -I- to the -WE-. From an isolated collection of individuals to a globalised community without loosing our hard-won individuality and the things that make us unique at a local level?

Between all these chats I did manage to get some sewing done. I’ve based the design of this quilt off a piece my grandmother made which is in her book “Folk Art Appliqué Quilts” (pictured below). I’ve been working for like a day and a half on the patchwork border and spent the afternoon trying to do the leaf border panels she has in her quilt but I failed miserably… I’ve got a bit of work to do before I can sew so many random curves together in such a way that they lie flat. Unfortunately her book isn’t very instructive when it comes to the finer details – Dawn was self taught and I get the feeling she just made things up as she went along.

2015/01/img_2594.jpg

So for now this is where I’m at,

2015/01/img_2574.jpg
I’m yet to build in the panels with the local animals/birds/plants that will bring this quilt together. I have a lot of work to do in the coming week!!

ECH Residency – Day 2

Today was a quiet drizelly day in emerald.

I spent the morning working quietly on my own, finishing the first panel of the Cockatoo kindergarden and then getting started on the second panel featuring Emerald Community House hall – here is a work in progress shot:

2015/01/img_2532-0.jpg

In the afternoon there was a small workshop in the second space of the hall, 5 local ladies where in there making really beautiful mosaic pots (see image below). At afternoon tea time they came over and introduced themselves and we had a chat about my work. They really loved what I have finished so far and one of the ladies, Donna, happened to be on the people who originally came up with the idea of transforming the derelict kindergarden into a memorial/museum of Ash Wednesday! She has been on the committee driving the project for ten years and was of course a part of the protests that prevented the building from being demolished.

2015/01/img_2536-0.jpg

Donna told me some of the history and details of the project and how it they finally managed to get support and funding to get it to happen. Having spent four years speaking to community leaders in disaster affected areas around the country the story she told me is a familiar one: Its a story of local people identifying a need or gap in their community and coming up with their own solution to address it – but then having to fight a long and drawn out battle to win political and monetary support to realise their ideas; Its a story of local women at the forefront of grassroots leadership – doing amazing, innovative things – but still having to struggle with how our society perceived women who show leadership (‘bossy’, ‘pushy’ and ‘a bit too in your face); Its a story about the struggle to get local emergency services to recognise the importance of community resilience building activities that address the phycological issues that arise from disaster events (but don’t have anything to do with ‘putting out the fires’). Its a story about how grassroots leaders adapt and learn to lead from behind (placing ‘important, white, men’ as the spokesmen for their ideas). The good news is that Donna spoke about how much things have changed, and that the Cockatoo kindergarden is now heritage listed and about to be rebuilt.

She also shared some snippets from different stories about the building, such as: During the fire while the 300 people were sheltering in the building there were three firemen on the roof protecting it, and that the building continued to act as a refuge after the fire, at least for one girl who used to break in there at night to get away from domestic issues in her family. She said she has a lot more photos to show me and that she will hopefully pop in to see me again.

Here is the finished panel of the cockatoo kindergarden building soon to be an Ash Wednesday memorial/museum. Complete with Dot standing on the roof protesting the proposed demolition of the building.

2015/01/img_2528.jpg

ECH Residency

Today I start my residency at Emerald Community House (ECH) in the Dandenong Ranges, VIC. I will be spending the next two weeks working at the old church which has been converted into a community hall to create a textile wall hanging that speaks of this site and of the Emerald community.

I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land upon which I will be working the Bunurong people and the Woiworung people from the Kulin nation, and pay my respects to their elders past and present.

I am leaving the doors open for anyone from the Emerald community to come in and check out what I’m doing and even get involved. If you are in the area pop in and say hi! If not, stay tuned here as I will be posting regularly with updates on my progress and on the experieance of this unique residency which I worked with ECH to design.

As you can see below, this residency will also involve an 8 week community workshop series where I will be working with local community members on a collaborative textile wall hanging project. All this is linked and a part of my PhD practice led research into Cloth-Art as a Socially Engaged Practice. So look forward to updates about that phase of the project also.

2015/01/img_2408.png

2015/01/img_2409.png